FoC 028: What Do Greek Myths and Victorian Poetry Have in Common?

 

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We’re talking about them on our new book swap episode! Today we’ll be exploring Greek myths and Victorian poetry in our latest book swap selections Till We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis and Possession by A.S. Byatt.

We discuss the beautiful imagery of faith in C.S. Lewis’s masterwork, then toss around ideas of feminism, sexuality, marriage, and creativity with A.S. Byatt’s Possession. We hope this conversation makes you want to pick up these books if you haven’t read them yet, and if you have, we hope you’ll join in the discussion!

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We’re also excited to introduce The Fountains of Carrots Raspberry Cordial Social Club – a Facebook group dedicated to fostering cultured conversation and making friends with fellow Fountains of Carrots Podcast listeners. We will be hanging out there on Facebook and hope to hear from you and have great discussions online. We’ll also share upcoming episodes, topics, and ideas as well as hear from you and what you would like to hear on the podcast. We hope it’ll feel like we’re all having coffee together on Facebook, so come on over!

 

 

Mentioned in this episode:

possession Possession by A.S. Byatt

till we have facesTill We Have Faces by C.S. Lewis

Beauty and the Beast

Gilead

True Detective

Haley’s crazy road trip.

The upcoming Edel Gathering

Missed the past book swap episodes? See them all here.

 

You can listen to us on iTunes, and we’d love a quick rating or review. If you have an android device we’re also on Stitcher. And as always, you can find all links, show notes, upcoming guests, and listen to all episodes at Fountains of Carrots.com.

 

3 thoughts on “FoC 028: What Do Greek Myths and Victorian Poetry Have in Common?”

  1. Ladies, great book reviews! I’ve added both novels to my reading list. I love historic fiction, so the Victorian Era aspect of Possession definitely appeals. As for the C. S. Lewis book – really liked the discussion on the main character not seeing or recognizing herself. The title seems to apply to many characters in the novel, and not just the god she is forbidden to see.

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